Anyone Put Their Book On Nook Pubit Or The Kindle?

Discussion in 'Indie Writing, Publishing & Marketing Discussion' started by Shirl, Jan 19, 2012.

  1. Shirl

    Shirl New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2012
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    Has anyone put their book on the Nook through Pubit, or Kindle? I saw that with the Nook they allow authors to submit their ebook for free and Barnes and Noble sells it for you giving you up to 65% profit. The Nook is really going big advertising how they now cater to Children's Books, and I think it would be a great time to take advantage of this offer. Any feedback?
    Shirley
     
    #1
  2. Gloria

    Gloria New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2012
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    I've published two books on Kindle, plus Nook via Smashwords. I later unpublished with Smashwords to take part in KIndle Select (for 90 days). Nothing much happened with the Nook, but my Kindle sales and borrows are promising. I've published with a traditional Christian publisher in the past but really really like working with CreateSpace and KDP.

    www.gloriarepp.com
     
    #2
  3. Breynolds2012

    Breynolds2012 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2012
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    1
    I have published my book on both the Nook and Kindle. Both are very easy to use.

    1. You need to upload your documents in Microsoft Word or HTML,
    2. preview what you have uploaded,
    3. Fill out information about the book (author, title, book description, price info, rights)
    4. Save and Publish, then the book will be available in 12-24 hours. (usually 12 hours if you have already published the book

    There are a lot of discussions going on now about this, but I recommend publishing with Amazon now because they offer the best value for new authors if you take advantage of the KDP Select Program. You can use the free advertising tools, which allows you to give your books way for free. This does wonders for getting exposure and increasing sales. Plus, with Amazon, you can enroll your books in their lending library, which offers additional streams of income. Every author needs to decide which vendor works best for them, but I am pretty happy with Amazon now. Hope this helps.
     
    #3
    Gloria likes this.
  4. ShawnLamb

    ShawnLamb New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2012
    Messages:
    122
    Likes Received:
    13
    I use both Kindle and Nook. (Not KDS) I will not Smashwords since they don't use DRM. It's too easy to pirate e-books without DRM.
     
    #4
  5. Michael J Scott

    Michael J Scott New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2012
    Messages:
    242
    Likes Received:
    53
    I've got my books on the Kindle and Nook. I've used both Amazon and Smashwords, and both are fairly easy to use. The thing to remember with Smashwords is to use chapter headings formatted like this "Chapter 1", "Chapter 2" as opposed to "One", "Two", etc. Of course, all page breaks and header/footer info needs to go as well. Their meatgrinder software can convert your book easily enough to the necessary formats, but if you don't use the chapter headings (or something similar), you'll get autovetter errors, which will delay the release of your book. On kindle, this isn't such a big deal.

    Shawnlamb is right: the lack of DRM does leave open the potential for piracy, but this is what Coker has to say about it:

    Bottom line for me: I make more money through Smashwords than I do through Amazon (46% vs 42%, with 12% coming from paperback sales), so I highly recommend both. Piracy just means someone likes my work well enough to steal it, and that likely means I'll be building up a fan base elsewhere who'll come back and buy more of my books later. I hate piracy as much as the next guy. I want to get paid for my work, but knowing that others are reading my stuff even beyond what I've sold just means I've got a better chance of reaching a wider pool, so I chalk up any thievery as a marketing expense, one I don't actually have to pay for except in some lost change.
     
    #5
  6. ShawnLamb

    ShawnLamb New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2012
    Messages:
    122
    Likes Received:
    13
    Michael, I have to disagree with your statement that "people like my work well enough to steal it" No, pirates are stealing any author's work to put up on sites to sell month subscriptions. I ran across this with a group on FB about 6 months ago, where an author found her pirated book on a site offering unlimited download of e-books for a membership fee. (I'll have to search to find the link) But together the group (300 strong) emailed the site and demanded it be taken down. An hour later they did. In many case, authors aren't making money, the pirates are.
     
    #6
  7. Michael J Scott

    Michael J Scott New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2012
    Messages:
    242
    Likes Received:
    53
    You're missing my point, I'm afraid. The pirates only make money if they sell my work (or someone else's), which means there has to be someone out there to buy my work from the pirates. Those people, even though they are paying the wrong group (pirates instead of me), are nevertheless readers. And the more of them who like my work, the more there are who are likely to buy my work from me in the future, let alone recommend it to others.

    The point is, before you can have fans who will buy your work consistently, you have to first have readers who will read your work consistently. And this is precisely where I'm trying to make headway.

    Mind you, I'm not supporting piracy. I'd rather get paid, too. What I am saying is that e-piracy doesn't hurt me as much as it might seem (unlike pirating something that I've actually paid to produce, like a print book), because in the end, I gain more through increased exposure than I do through making sure all my books are protected. I may lose a few sales, but I don't lose anything in terms of production costs. And I maintain that I will more than make up for that as my books--and my reputation as a quality writer--increases.
     
    #7
    EBraten likes this.
  8. Michael J Scott

    Michael J Scott New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2012
    Messages:
    242
    Likes Received:
    53
    That being said, you are welcome to keep your books protected via DRM. And I'm welcome to make mine more accessible.
     
    #8
  9. ShawnLamb

    ShawnLamb New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2012
    Messages:
    122
    Likes Received:
    13
    I didn't think I was missing your point. Pirates are making money whether selling individual books or subscriptions. The question is, where will the readers go after reading a pirated book? Back to the subscription site or the author? I think the best way to curtail pirating is to protect my books. But as you said, we each do what we believe best, no need to argue further.
     
    #9
  10. MaryCFindley

    MaryCFindley New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2012
    Messages:
    119
    Likes Received:
    10
    We wanted to put our books up through the Pubit program but they require credit card information and admitted they can charge you for returns before they even pay out on sales. So we publish through Smashwords. If you are concerned about piracy (and I'm not at all saying it's not a serious issue) set up Google alerts to notify you of activity related to your name and book titles. An author friend found a piracy site that way trying to make a buck off her books and was able to stop it.
     
    #10