1. fairieswriter

    fairieswriter New Member

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    So, how many of you tried to get endorsements from published writers? Did you find it easy? When did you start seeking endorsements?

    For me it proved a relatively easy task, mostly because I know a lot of writers. I worked for years on building relationships with other writers before asking them to read my final copy. I made sure that I gave them enough time to read it before the pub date so that I could place them into the book. Some declined because they were too busy, one declined after reading a little of it, but a good number agreed. I made sure to tell them that they could decide whether to endorse it after reading it. I wanted to make sure that they didn't feel pressured into endorsing it if they didn't like it.

    I first sought writers who wrote in my genre. Then I asked those I knew liked fantasy, even if they didn't write it. Finally, I asked some that I knew liked some of the minor themes like romance and spiritual warfare.

    I also asked some of my target audience to read it for possible endorsement, such as: homeschool moms, homeschool kids, teens, youth pastors, and ministers. I used some of these on the inside of the book under "Advance Praise". I also added some to my blog. I put some of them up on the Amazon page where it says "Editorial Reviews".

    How about you? Where have you placed endorsements?
     
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  2. RebeccaPMinor

    RebeccaPMinor New Member

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    The endorsement process is very intimidating to me, owing mostly to my personality type. I have to work up the courage to ask people for the time of day. ;)

    One thing that I'm grateful for is that I took a class with a best selling author last spring, and he agreed to write cover blurbs for any of us in the class who got contracts for the books we were workshopping with him. I have to tap some more contemporaries for further quotes and endorsements, which I hope turns out to be as painless as you've made it sound.
     
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  3. fairieswriter

    fairieswriter New Member

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    I've put your books on my wishlist. ;)
     
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  4. silumenye

    silumenye New Member

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    Living in Australia, it is not easy to find well-known authors who would be willing to read my books. And to be honest, I have no idea how I would go about contacting anyone in the first place. I'd imagine popular authors get enough emails and letters from people. It'd be pretty hard to stand out from the crowd.
     
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  5. EBraten

    EBraten New Member

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    As a reader, I rarely ever pay attention to endorsements if the book is fiction. I flip right past them. What draws me in is a good blurb and if I like the blurb, a gripping intro. When I'm deciding on whether to buy a book or borrow it from the library, I always check out those two things: blurb and intro.

    One of my pet peeves is actually novels that have lots of endorsements but which tell me nothing about the content. I'm likely to put that book down and move on to the next.

    If it's a non-fiction book, then I'll look at the endorsements, if any. Hope my comment isn't off topic, but it's just my two cents'!
     
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  6. fairieswriter

    fairieswriter New Member

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    With the Internet, the world has become even smaller. If it it Christian fiction that you write, I can tell you that the writers LOVE to hear from fans and other writers. Just find your favorites on Facebook or their blogs. Leave comments and you can start to build great friendships.

    Because I do free book blog tours, I meet a huge number of writers. I do deal mostly with publishers and publicists, but I befriend the writers on Facebook. I've actually had many search me out to befriend me, which is cool. It tickles me when someone like Donita K. Paul asks to be my friend. I get goosebumps. :wub:

    Also, most of the writers had to start at the bottom too. So, they remember and are willing to help.
     
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  7. fairieswriter

    fairieswriter New Member

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    I love looking at the endorsements. If it is from a writer that I enjoy, I stand up and pay attention...however, if it is from a bunch of people that I do not recognize, I'll just flip through them quickly.
     
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  8. silumenye

    silumenye New Member

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    I read a lot of American western fiction, even though that isn't the genre I write. I don't know of any Christian writers who write non-allegorical, realistic mediaeval fantasy. If I did, I'd be reading them... :)

    I guess part of my problem is that I'm a little shy. I honestly wouldn't know what to say.
     
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  9. fairieswriter

    fairieswriter New Member

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    Jill Williamson writes realistic medieval fantasy books: By Darkness Hid, To Darkness Fled, and From Darkness Won. You should check them out. She's published by Marcher Lord Press, a relatively new publisher that publishes Christian Fantasy and Sci-Fi. Hmm, also Dean Briggs writes similar kinds of novels: (Legends of Karac Tor) The Book of Names, Corus the Champion, and The Song of Unmaking. He's published by Living Ink Books...the ones who published Bryan Davis' dragon series. Both Jill and Dean love to chat on Facebook and on their blogs.
     
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  10. ShawnLamb

    ShawnLamb New Member

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    From what I've discovered, authors are hesitant to 'endorse' fellow authors. Remember, we put our reputation on the line when doing so. If the book fails, how will that endorsement reflect on us? We have our credibility to consider before placing a public stamp of approval for use in marketing campaigns or on the book jacket.
     
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